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Collaborative research published in ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering

April 26, 2017 - Synthetic rubber and plastics—used for manufacturing tires, toys and myriad other products—are produced from butadiene, a molecule traditionally made from petroleum or natural gas. But those man-made materials could get a lot greener soon, thanks to the ingenuity of a team of scientists from three U.S. research universities. The scientific team—from the University of Minnesota, University of Delaware, and the University of Massachusetts—has invented a process to make butadiene from renewable sources like trees, grasses and corn. The findings are published online in the American Chemical Society’s ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, a leading journal in green chemistry and engineering. The study’s authors are all affiliated with the Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI) based at the University of Delaware. CCEI is an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

“This newer technology significantly expands the slate of molecules we can make from lignocellulose,” said Paul Dauenhauer, a University of Minnesota chemical engineering and materials science associate professor who is co-director of CCEI and a co-author of the study.

Butadiene is the chief chemical component in a broad range of materials found throughout society. When this four-carbon molecule undergoes a chemical reaction to form long chains called polymers, styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) is formed, which is used to make abrasive-resistant automobile tires. When blended to make nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR), it becomes the key component in hoses, seals and the rubber gloves ubiquitous to medical settings.

In the world of plastics, butadiene is the chief chemical component in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS), a hard plastic that can be molded into rigid shapes. Tough ABS plastic is used to make video game consoles, automotive parts, sporting goods, medical devices and interlocking plastic toy bricks, among other products.

“Our team combined a catalyst we recently discovered with new and exciting chemistry to find the first high-yield, low-cost method of manufacturing butadiene,” said CCEI Director Dionisios Vlachos, the Allan and Myra Ferguson Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware and a co-author of the study. “This research could transform the multi-billion-dollar plastics and rubber industries.”

The invention of renewable rubber is part of CCEI’s larger mission. Initiated in 2009, CCEI has focused on transformational catalytic technology to produce renewable chemicals and biofuels from natural biomass sources.

Additional co-authors include Professor Michael Tsapatsis, postdoctoral researchers Dae Sung Park, Charles Spanjers, Limin Ren and Omar Abdelrahman, and graduate student Katherine Vinter, all from the University of Minnesota, and Professor Wei Fan and graduate student Hong Je Cho from the University of Massachusetts.

To read the full research paper, titled “Biomass-Derived Butadiene by Dehydra-Decyclization of Tetrahydrofuran,” visit the ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering website: http://pubs.acs.org/journal/ascecg

Excerpt taken from a news release, "Researchers invent process to make sustainable rubber, plastics" written by Rhonda Zurn, College of Science and Engineering, and Lacey Nygard, University News Service.

Related Link: http://z.umn.edu/sustainablerubber

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